Prostate Cancer: What You Need To Know Part 1!

dingaan-with-wife

1 of the patients the ECCT supports – Fiyosi (pictured left) who was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

by Francis Nyachowe, ECCT Field Officer

Prostate cancer is becoming increasingly common amongst men in Zimbabwe and here at ECCT, we thought we should give you some more information about it. Knowledge is power…and we begin with Part 1 of our information series this week.

Definition

Prostate cancer is cancer that occurs in a man’s prostate — a small walnut-shaped gland that produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm.

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men. Prostate cancer usually grows slowly and initially remains confined to the prostate gland, where it may not cause serious harm. While some types of prostate cancer grow slowly and may need minimal or no treatment, other types are aggressive and can spread quickly.

Prostate cancer that is detected early — when it’s still confined to the prostate gland — has a better chance of successful treatment.

dingaan-getting-treatment

1 of the patients we support – Fiyosi – receiving his treatment at Parirenyatwa Hospital. He was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

Symptoms

Prostate cancer may cause no signs or symptoms in its early stages.

Prostate cancer that is more advanced may cause signs and symptoms such as:

  • Trouble urinating
  • Decreased force in the stream of urine
  • Blood in the semen
  • Discomfort in the pelvic area
  • Bone pain
  • Erectile dysfunction.

When to see a doctor

Make an appointment with your doctor if you have any signs or symptoms that worry you.

There is debate regarding the risks and benefits of screening for prostate cancer, and medical organizations differ on their recommendations. Discuss prostate cancer screening with your doctor. Together, you can decide what’s best for you.

Pictured here is the husband of 1 of our cancer patients receiving a food hamper.

Causes

It’s not clear what causes prostate cancer.

Doctors know that prostate cancer begins when some cells in your prostate become abnormal. Mutations in the abnormal cells’ DNA cause the cells to grow and divide more rapidly than normal cells do. The abnormal cells continue living, when other cells would die. The accumulating abnormal cells form a tumor that can grow to invade nearby tissue. Some abnormal cells can break off and spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body.

Risk factors

Factors that can increase your risk of prostate cancer include:

  • Older age.Your risk of prostate cancer increases as you age.
  • Being black.Black men have a greater risk of prostate cancer than do men of other races. In black men, prostate cancer is also more likely to be aggressive or advanced. It’s not clear why this is.
  • Family history of prostate or breast cancer.If men in your family have had prostate cancer, your risk may be increased. Also, if you have a family history of genes that increase the risk of breast cancer (BRCA1 or BRCA2) or a very strong family history of breast cancer, your risk of prostate cancer may be higher.
  • Obese men diagnosed with prostate cancer may be more likely to have advanced disease that’s more difficult to treat

Complications

Complications of prostate cancer and its treatments include:

  • Cancer that spreads (metastasizes). Prostate cancer can spread to nearby organs, such as your bladder, or travel through your bloodstream or lymphatic system to your bones or other organs. Prostate cancer that spreads to the bones can cause pain and broken bones. Once prostate cancer has spread to other areas of the body, it may still respond to treatment and may be controlled, but it’s unlikely to be cured.
  • Both prostate cancer and its treatment can cause urinary incontinence. Treatment for incontinence depends on the type you have, how severe it is and the likelihood it will improve over time. Treatment options may include medications, catheters and surgery.
  • Erectile dysfunction. Erectile dysfunction can be a result of prostate cancer or its treatment, including surgery, radiation or hormone treatments. Medications, vacuum devices that assist in achieving erection and surgery are available to treat erectile dysfunction

If you have signs or symptoms that worry you, start by seeing your family doctor or a general practitioner.

In Part 2…we will be giving you information on what steps to take if you see your doctor and (s)he suspects that you have a problem with your prostate.

 To see more of our work, join our Community on Facebook by clicking here now.

Help us support our patients by visiting our website by clicking here now. 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s